Twenty Sided

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Continue reading 〉〉 “#17 Setting the Stage”

Shamus Young is a programmer, an author, and nearly a composer. He works on this site full time. If you’d like to support him, you can do so via Patreon or PayPal.

At the end of the attack on city hall, the camera pans over to reveal the horrible truth that the leader of the demons is actually… the guy we already guessed it was! Dun dun duuuun!

We cut to a week later. There’s a funeral scene for Officer Davis, and Peter Parker and Miles Morales meet. Over the coming chapters they’ll make friends and Peter will get Miles a job working at FEAST.

When the funeral is over, Pete changes to Spider-Man and asks Yuri if the police have located Martin Li yet.

Hang On. When Did You Figure That Out?

This is the big reveal that Martin Li is the leader of the Demons. Peter Parker is a block away, behind a bunch of debris, unconscious. There's no way he saw this.

This is the big reveal that Martin Li is the leader of the Demons. Peter Parker is a block away, behind a bunch of debris, unconscious. There’s no way he saw this.

It feels like we missed a pretty big story beat here. How does Spider-Man know that Martin Li is the leader of the Demons? Yes, that fact was revealed to the audience in the previous cutscene, but Peter wasn’t anywhere near Li when that happened. Moreover, Pete was unconscious at the time.

At some point in the last week, Peter Parker discovered that his friend – who is also Aunt May’s employer – is a mass-murdering terrorist. That’s a really big deal! It’s also the answer to the mystery he’s been chasing for the last couple of missions. And yet this discovery took place off-screen?

Continue reading 〉〉 “Spider-Man Part 12: Silver Sable”

Shamus Young is a programmer, an author, and nearly a composer. He works on this site full time. If you’d like to support him, you can do so via Patreon or PayPal.

In my column this week, I talk about Google’s plan for Stadia, their new streaming games platform. This was a hard one to write because on the surface it looks like Google is being stupid or foolish. I’m comfortable second-guessing EA and Activision because they’ve perpetrated a lot of stupidity and foolishness in the past. But Google doesn’t have a history of this sort of behavior, which makes me think I must be missing something.

My favorite part is this bit from the Stadia website: Continue reading 〉〉 “Experienced Points: Is Google Stadia Doomed?”

Shamus Young is a programmer, an author, and nearly a composer. He works on this site full time. If you’d like to support him, you can do so via Patreon or PayPal.

This series analyzes the show, but sometimes references the books as well. If you read it, expect spoilers for both.

It’s Game of Thrones season again!

Some of you may be more excited about this than others. Over the past two seasons, critical opinions of the show have dropped, but that hasn’t made much of a dent in its overall popularity. There’s a threshold at which popularity becomes self-reinforcing: people start watching the show just to see what all the fuss is about. People (like me) who don’t think it’s very good anymore watch because we’ve already invested so much time in it and we want to see how it ends. Just as people who don’t follow football will still watch the Super Bowl, people who ordinarily aren’t interested in fantasy fiction will still watch Game of Thrones.

Because of this dynamic, by now I pay as much attention to people’s reactions to the show as I do to the show itself. In fact, when I first started writing about it back in the olden days of 2017, I operated off the premise that a mass souring of opinion on the series was imminent. That prediction hasn’t been borne out to the extent I thought it would, but there’s still time. In fact, in the days leading up to the premiere, the internet seemed to be bracing itself for disappointment. Instead of linking many examples, I’ll just link one representative one, titled “There’s No Way For Game Of Thrones To Get The Ending It Deserves.”

Its ending got the start it deserves, though. They've almost entirely redone the opening credits. This screengrab doesn't do it justice, it's just there to show one example: the wall now has a hole in it.

Its ending got the start it deserves, though. They’ve almost entirely redone the opening credits. This screengrab doesn’t do it justice, it’s just there to show one example: the wall now has a hole in it.

This may have been inevitable. This is the last season – the ending – and the endings of big-ticket “television events” don’t have the greatest track record. The only one I can think of that ended on a real high note was Breaking Bad, and even then there were differences of opinion. And Game of Thrones is going to have an even tougher job of it than usual, because there’s been a set of thorny problems baked into the story they’re adapting from day one. To massively oversimplify, the Song of Ice and Fire books had three main storylines. The “A” story was the Stark/Lannister conflict and its attendant political intrigue. The “B” story was Daenerys’ adventures on the other side of the narrow sea. And the lurking “C” story was the supernatural threat north of the Wall.

Continue reading 〉〉 “Game of Thrones Season Eight: “Winterfell””

Bob Case MrBtongue is the Pele of complaining about videogames and will soon be the Garrincha of complaining about TV shows. You can find his Youtube channel at youtube.com/user/MrBtongue.

Hosts:

Paul

,

Shamus

. Episode edited by

Issac

.

Show notes: Continue reading 〉〉 “Diecast #252: Far: Lone Sails, Early Access, Level Design”

Shamus Young is a programmer, an author, and nearly a composer. He works on this site full time. If you’d like to support him, you can do so via Patreon or PayPal.

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